Reading/Answering Questions Live Today

Today at 1:00 PM Pacific Time, at THIS LINK, I’ll be one of three authors in the NovoPulp Volume III Launch Party Google Hangout.

I’ll read some pages from my SF story about the same topic that’s in my Psychological Suspense series, The Agents of the Nevermind — social engineering by Intelligence agents.

If you’re interested, you can watch and ask questions of any of us.

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The REAL crime fiction

For the sake of being commercially viable and safe, much crime fiction ignores truths that are controversial, dangerous, pandering instead to a brainwashed populace. Major publishers understandably have to consider what kinds of friends and enemies in high places their book’s messages make them. But some authors do take that chance of rocking the boat, and I’d like to see more people take risks to produce authentic, culturally meaningful Thriller/Suspense/Mystery unafraid of referencing the fictionalized news in our Cover-up Culture. I, myself, like to write crime fiction that brings attention to people destroyed by, or fighting, the system brutalizes innocent people by distorting reality.

Should we ignore the real crimes against the human psyche by corrupt law professionals, the creation of patsies, COINTELPRO style undermining of the lives of activists, manipulation of citizens through disinformation in the news and CounterIntelligence-created cults? Should we turn a blind eye to the military taking over countries for a sneaky agenda, the ruthlessness of hidden interconnectedness including pest control/waste management – food/poison manufacture — evangelists/government — Theosophy/UN — and so on?

I find crime fiction that props up the corrupt paradigm to be boring, predictable, and old hat. I get excited when I read, or watch movies, that rebel against fakery. Most popular authors seem to present the police or Intelligence agents as being always the good guys, or they single out rogue members of a supposedly great agency. However, many readers are hungry for smart revelations and useful information; when narratives get them to think, and point them cautiously in the direction of true societal crime on a large scale, it’s a service instead of distracting entertainment that reinforces demeaning propaganda.

I prefer to write about crimes which are not simply personal but which are common social problems, such as the FBI creating terrorists by suggesting and funding people otherwise not inclined or capable of committing major crimes.

US: Terrorism Prosecutions Often An Illusion Human Rights Watch reports: “Multiple studies have found that nearly 50 percent of the federal counterterrorism convictions since September 11, 2001, resulted from informant-based cases. Almost 30 percent were sting operations in which the informant played an active role in the underlying plot.”

Substantial numbers of newscasters are paid by the CIA or bribed and backmailed to create the fiction warmongers want people to believe, such as Udo Ulfkotte bravely admits. I like fiction that doesn’t shy away from revealing the lies beneath the brainwashing of our society.

I suspect the majority of Literary readers/writers are not particularly passionate or educated about true crime topics. They would be required to question what authorities paid by CounterIntelligence present the masses for the purpose of creating divisiveness. They have other things on their minds, and that’s fine. But that’s one reason I love Genre, which has the potential to reach more readers with hard-hitting message. It’s often written by insiders, and people with extensive experience outside academia, who don’t need to avoid upsetting university superiors.

Authors who take the time to pull away layers of the deceits created by governments don’t find the same fan-base for those controversial topics in Literary Fiction as they do in Genre. There are few Literary magazines to even submit such stories to for consideration. But Political Thrillers and SF readers are more amenable to authors who take an interest in solid facts and world issues. The readers tend to be more action-based, interested in what corporations do, political intrigue, conspiracies, the direction advanced technology is taking our society, murder and mayhem, legalities, mysteries, danger. SF has the option of writing about topics that might otherwise cause the authors problems by using the future and alternate worlds as metaphors to address sensitive issues.

The real crime fiction is that created by bankers, governments, the military, and corporations, using “news” to create a false sense of reality that the majority of people are hoodwinked by. When fiction writers echo that illusion, they are — willing, or unwilling — co-conspirators in dumbing down our culture. When authors are brave enough to look beyond the naivite of the two party system, and write about what’s behind the machinations of the propaganda machine — hats off!

Some brave Thrillers:

The Deal (movie)

Lexicon by Max Barry

Dime Bomb by J. Arthur

Dark Alliance by Gary Web — movie Kill the Messenger

Some insightful SF:

Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury

A Clockwork Orange by Anthony Burgess

The Culture by Iain M. Banks

Iron Heel by Jack London

Neuromancer by William Gibson

Minority Report by Philip K. Dick

Mind Control busting YA:

Control Group by Patrick Jones

Candor by Pam Bachorz

Little Brother by Cory Doctorow

Crime Fiction

The mystery of the shining children by Cale Carlson

Morning, Come Quickly by Wanda Karriker

List of fiction about ritual abuse

YA fiction about mind control

Advanced Technology good for knowing about our world, and writing SF

Amazing, yes? I used these topics in my SF novel manuscript, Unside: A Book of Closed Time-like Curves. If these things interest you, sign up for the email list so you’ll know when it’s available.
How do you feel about these advancements?What do you think DARPA is not sharing with us?

Advanced technology that’s freaky-real — and good inspiration for Science Fiction writers

Here are some links to current and officially proposed below that you might find useful for your writing, and understanding our world. To me, it’s Dystopian. Some will see it as Utopian.

My novel manuscript, Unside: A Book of Closed Time-like Curves, arose from years of intensive research and staying up to date on proposed DARPA technology, etc., and watching how it’s used in manipulating our society. The links I’ll be sharing here cover topics featured in my novel. If you like these kinds of topics in your fiction, subscribe to the mailing list, and in the meantime, marvel, shiver, and write.

My SF story nominated for Pushcart Prize

My SF story, “Printed People Eaters,” was chosen as the narrative from the Conspiracy themed print and e-book anthology, Redacted Story, to be nominated for the Pushcart Prize. This is my 6th Pushcart Prize nomination.

The great Ashley Parker Owen‘s KY Story publishing house brings Appalachian authors to print. My mother’s family homesteaded on Sand Mountain, rural northeast Alabama, and I spent a big part of my life living there, loving the land, animals, trees, relatives, down-to-earth ways. My Great Grandparents moved there after Sherman destroyed their farm in Georgia. Some of the family stayed in Georgia (and eventually gave birth to Jimmy Carter, my third cousin.) My Grandparents both died young, leaving Mama and her siblings orphaned as children, raised by their aunts and uncles, most of which remained single all their lives. I was there a year and a half recently for the end of Papa’s life, but we lost the land due to theft by a con artist, which broke my heart. It will remain in my heart. I keep a piece of my friend– one of the old oak trees that was there when it was homesteaded — by my bed.

The anthology has a 5 star rating on Amazon. I have a second story in it as well.

KY Story’s other publications’ nominations: Appalachian Voice: John Vanderslice, “Escape to Ash,” John Sparks, “Fishing with Abraham,” Tom Sheehan, “Sixty Years Later at a Mid-Earth Pub.” Motherlode: “Oren Hammerquist,” “Desert Daddy,” Treg Isaacson, “Growing Up or Not.”

KY Story is current taking submissions about Bullying for an anthology, deadline Feb. 25th 2015.

Origami Mafia Story Unfolds

Though the American Psychological Association reported in 2008 that the Zero-Tolerance policies set into motion in 1994 do not contribute to making schools safer, in 2013, children began being suspended and arrested for imaginary guns. Some of the offences included pointing a breaded chicken finger at a teacher, playing cops and robbers with a paper gun, throwing an imaginary grenade while pretending to be a soldier, owning a pink toy gun that blows soapy bubbles, writing about killing a dinosaur using a gun, threatening other kids with a toy gun of rolled-up paper, drawing a picture of a gun when the teacher said to look up at the clouds and draw what they saw, twirling a pencil in class, chewing a strawberry Pop Tart into the shape of a gun, molding a pastry into what a teacher decided looked like a gun, and talking about toy guns to classmates.

SF story, Origami Mafia Unfolds, as News from the Future, at The Subtopian.

Breaking the Seal

#Report Readout att: Subjects Discovering Project
Underground:Implantation Adjustment
As recorded from the brain of Kundra, Atlanta, Georgia, Earth, Hybrid Helicopter zone 13.#

The thundering sound is happening again under me, down deep in the earth, and it makes me want to save the world. I want to tell people about it before it’s too late— if I can avoid repercussions. The housemate who always has nightmares when they are blasting down there is yelling himself out of his sleep in another room.

My SF story, Breaking the Seal, at Gone Lawn.

The Coveted General Anzel Smile

Whenever I see lunar rays coming into my room on new moons, when I hear the catbird bark, and I feel my internal organs curling, jumbling up like chitlins and sweetmeats on a tray handed a dying man in the desert, weakening in the sun before he can reach up to take them, I suspect they are coming for me again, like they did, starting years ago, when I was transferred to command at the new Army base. Little did I know I’d be waking with scrapes on my arms, grass scattered around my pillow, spend my hours trying to understand my secret life. It wasn’t my idea. It was theirs. Whoever they are.

SF story, The Coveted General Anzel Smile, at The Strange and the Curious.